Effect of glycemic index of breakfast on energy intake at subsequent meal among healthy people: A meta-analysis

14Citations
Citations of this article
89Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Meals with low glycemic index (GI) may suppress short-term appetite and reduce subsequent food intake compared with high-GI meals. However, no meta-analysis has been conducted to synthesize the evidence. This meta-analytic study was conducted to assess the effect of high- and low-GI breakfast on subsequent short-term food intake. Trials were identified through MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials, and manual searches of bibliographies until May 2015. Randomized controlled and cross-over trials comparing the effect of low- with high-GI breakfast on subsequent energy intake among healthy people were included. Nine studies consisting of 11 trials met the inclusion criteria. Only one trial was classified with high methodological quality. A total of 183 participants were involved in the trials. The meta-analytic results revealed no difference in breakfast GI (high-GI vs. low-GI) on subsequent short-term energy intake. In conclusion, it seems that breakfast GI has no effect on short-term energy among healthy people. However, high quality studies are still warranted to provide more concrete evidence.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Sun, F. H., Li, C., Zhang, Y. J., Wong, S. H. S., & Wang, L. (2016, January 4). Effect of glycemic index of breakfast on energy intake at subsequent meal among healthy people: A meta-analysis. Nutrients. MDPI AG. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8010037

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free