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Bra wearing not associated with breast cancer risk: A population-based case-control study

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Abstract

Despite thewidespread use of bras among U.S.women and concerns in the lay media that bra wearing may increase breast cancer risk, there is a scarcity of credible scientific studies addressing this issue. The goal of the study was to evaluate the relationship between various bra-wearing habits and breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women. We conducted a population-based case-control study of breast cancer in the Seattle-Puget Sound metropolitan area that compared 454 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) cases and 590 invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2004 with 469 control women between 55 to 74 years of age. Information on bra-wearing habits and other breast cancer risk factors was collected from study participants through in-person interviews. Multivariate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using polytomous logistic regression. No aspect of bra wearing, including bra cup size, recency, average number of hours/day worn, wearing a bra with an underwire, or age first began regularly wearing a bra, was associated with risks of either IDC or ILC. Our results did not support an association between bra wearing and increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women.

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APA

Chen, L., Malone, K. E., & Li, C. I. (2014). Bra wearing not associated with breast cancer risk: A population-based case-control study. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, 23(10), 2181–2185. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-0414

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