Does tumor size improve the accuracy of prognostic prediction in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma after surgical resection?

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Abstract

This study aimed to investigate whether the inclusion of tumor size could improve the prognostic accuracy in patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). A total of 387 patients with ESCC who underwent curative resection were enrolled in this analysis. The patients were categorized into small-sized tumors (SSTs) and largesized tumors (LSTs) using an appropriate cut-off point for tumor size. Kaplan-Meier survival curve and log-rank test were used to evaluate the prognostic value of tumor size. A Cox regression model was adopted for multivariate analysis. Their accuracy was compared based on the presence or absence of tumor size. Using 3.5 cm as the optimal cut-off point, 228 and 159 patients presented with LSTs (≥ 3.5 cm) and SSTs (< 3.5 cm), respectively. The patients with LSTs had significantly worse prognoses than patients with SSTs (23.9% vs. 43.2%, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that tumor size, histological type, invasion depth, and lymph node metastasis were independent predictors of overall survival. The addition of tumor size to the AJCC TNM staging improved the predictive accuracy of the 5-year survival rate by 3.9%. Further study showed that tumor size and T stage were independent predictors of the prognosis of node-negative patients, and the combination of tumor size and T stage improved the predictive accuracy by 3.7%. In conclusion, tumor size is indeed a simple and practical prognostic factor in patients with ESCC. It can be used to improve the prognostic accuracy of the current TNM staging, especially for patients with node-negative disease.

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APA

Zhang, H., Tang, P., Miao, X., Gao, Y., Shang, X., Gong, L., … Yu, Z. (2016). Does tumor size improve the accuracy of prognostic prediction in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma after surgical resection? Oncotarget, 7(41), 66623–66634. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.11286

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