High-field open versus short-bore magnetic resonance imaging of the spine: A randomized controlled comparison of image quality

9Citations
Citations of this article
28Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Background: The purpose of the present study was to compare the image quality of spinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed on a high-field horizontal open versus a short-bore MR scanner in a randomized controlled study setup. Methods: Altogether, 93 (80% women, mean age 53) consecutive patients underwent spine imaging after random assignement to a 1-T horizontal open MR scanner with a vertical magnetic field or a 1.5-T short-bore MR scanner. This patient subset was part of a larger cohort. Image quality was assessed by determining qualitative parameters, signal-tonoise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR), and quantitative contour sharpness. Results: The image quality parameters were higher for short-bore MR imaging. Regarding all sequences, the relative differences were 39% for the mean overall qualitative image quality, 53% for the mean SNR values, and 34-37% for the quantitative contour sharpness (P<0.0001). The CNR values were also higher for images obtained with the short-bore MR scanner. No sequence was of very poor (nondiagnostic) image quality. Scanning times were significantly longer for examinations performed on the open MR scanner (mean: 32±22 min versus 20±9 min; P<0.0001). Conclusions: In this randomized controlled comparison of spinal MR imaging with an open versus a short-bore scanner, short-bore MR imaging revealed considerably higher image quality with shorter scanning times. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00715806 © 2013 Enders et al.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Enders, J., Rief, M., Zimmermann, E., Asbach, P., Diederichs, G., Wetz, C., … Dewey, M. (2013). High-field open versus short-bore magnetic resonance imaging of the spine: A randomized controlled comparison of image quality. PLoS ONE, 8(12). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0083427

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free