Percutaneous closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defect using patent ductus arteriosus occluders

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Abstract

Objectives To assess the safety and efficacy of percutaneous closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defect (PmVSD) using patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) occluders. Background Widespread use of conventional PmVSD closure devices has been limited by unacceptable high rate of complete heart block (CHB). The elegant design of PDA occluders is supposed to ease implantation, increase closure rate and minimize damage to adjacent structures. Thus, PDA occluders may reduce complications, especially the CHB, and offer a good alternative for PmVSD closure. Method From September 2008 to October 2015, patients who underwent attempted percutaneous VSD closure using PDA occluders were included in the study. Patient demographics, echocardiography measurements, procedure details and follow-up data until October 2017 were collected. Results In total, 321 patients with a mean age of 15.5±12.6 years and mean a weight of 33.3±20.5 kg were included in this study. The mean defect size was 4.8±2.1 mm. Implantation was successful in 307 (95.6%) patients. The median follow-up time was 63 months (24 to 108 months). The closure rates were 89.5%, 91.5%, and 99.3% after the procedure 24 hours, 6 months and 2 years, respectively. Major complications occurred in 5 (1.7%) patients during the procedure and follow-up, including persistent CHB in 2 (0.7%) patients and device embolization in 3 (1.0%) patients. No death, disability, or other major complication was detected. Conclusion Percutaneous closure of PmVSD using PDA occluders is feasible, safe and efficacious in selected patients.

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Nguyen, H. L., Phan, Q. T., Doan, D. D., Dinh, L. H., Tran, H. B., Sharmin, S., … Kim, S. W. (2018). Percutaneous closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defect using patent ductus arteriosus occluders. PLoS ONE, 13(11). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0206535

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