Triple-negative apocrine carcinoma as a rare cause of a breast lump in a Syrian female: a case report and review of the literature

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Abstract

Background: Apocrine carcinoma is a rare tumor that constitutes < 4% of all breast malignancies, characterized by the proliferation of large atypical cells with strictly defined borders, abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, large nuclei, and prominent nucleoli in more than 90% of tumor cells. Triple-negative apocrine carcinoma is a rare molecular subtype that constitutes less than 1% of triple-negative breast cancers and is characterized by negative expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor, with positive expression of androgen receptor. Case presentation: We report a case of a 45-year-old Syrian female who presented to our hospital due to a painless palpable mass in her left breast. Following physical and radiological examinations, an excisional biopsy was performed. Microscopic examination of the specimen followed by immunohistochemical staining revealed the diagnosis of a triple-negative apocrine carcinoma. Conclusion: Triple-negative apocrine carcinoma is an extremely rare neoplasm that must be considered in the differential diagnoses of breast lesions through detailed clinical, histological, and immunohistochemical correlations. In our manuscript, we aimed to present the first case report of a Syrian female who was diagnosed with a triple-negative apocrine carcinoma, aiming to highlight the importance of detailed clinical, histological and immunohistochemical correlations with a detailed review of diagnostic criteria, molecular characteristics, and treatment recommendations.

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Ismail, S., Kherbek, H., Skef, J., Zahlouk, N., Abdulal, R., & Alshehabi, Z. (2021). Triple-negative apocrine carcinoma as a rare cause of a breast lump in a Syrian female: a case report and review of the literature. BMC Women’s Health, 21(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12905-021-01539-3

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