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Women's appraisals of intimate partner violence stressfulness and their relationship to depressive and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms

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Abstract

Intimate partner violence ( IPV) increases risk for depressive and posttraumatic stress disorder ( PTSD) symptoms. Most studies use a dose-response approach to examine the impact of IPV on mental health, but they often fail to explain mental health outcome specificity as well as to assess the impact of women's subjective appraisals. The present research examined women's IPV stressfulness appraisals and their psychological functioning (depressive and PTSD symptoms). Results indicate that IPV stressfulness appraisals are associated with depressive symptoms over and above frequency and severity of IPV. PTSD symptoms were associated with frequent and stressful IPV. Women who experienced highly frequent and highly stressful IPV were most likely to display comorbid depressive and PTSD symptoms. Results underscore the importance of women's subjective experiences and the heterogeneity of women's responses to IPV. © 2009 Springer Publishing Company.

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Martinez-Torteya, C., Bogat, G. A., Von Eye, A., Levendosky, A. A., & Davidson, W. S. (2009). Women’s appraisals of intimate partner violence stressfulness and their relationship to depressive and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Violence and Victims, 24(6), 707–722. https://doi.org/10.1891/0886-6708.24.6.707

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