Perinatal outcomes in women over 40 years of age compared to those of other gestations

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To clarify if older pregnant women were more likely to have adverse perinatal outcomes when compared to women at an ideal age to have a child. METHODS: The groups were divided according to age groups: under 20 years, ≥20 to <40 years, and ≥40 years. RESULTS: During the period from January 1st, 2008, to December 31st, 2008, there were 76 births from patients younger than 20 years and 91 births from patients aged 40 years or over. To form a third group with intermediate age, the data of 92 patients aged 20 to 40 years were obtained, totaling 259 patients. Patients aged 40 or older had a statistically greater number of cesarean sections and less use of forceps or normal deliveries (p<0.001). The use of spinal anesthesia was statistically higher among those aged 40 years or more (p<0.001). The frequency of male newborns was statistically higher in older patients, a group with statistically fewer first pregnancies (p<0.001). The frequency of premature newborns was statistically higher in patients aged 40 years or more (p=0.004). CONCLUSION: It is crucial to give priority to aged women, so that prenatal care will be appropriate, minimizing maternal complications and improving perinatal outcomes in this unique group.

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APA

Canhaço, E. E. duardo, Bergamo, A. M. endes, Lippi, U. G. azi, & Lopes, R. G. uedes C. (2015). Perinatal outcomes in women over 40 years of age compared to those of other gestations. Einstein (São Paulo, Brazil), 13(1), 58–64. https://doi.org/10.1590/S1679-45082015AO3204

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