‘Damn, Channing Tatum can move!’: Women’s accounts of men’s bodies and objectification in post-feminist times

2Citations
Citations of this article
4Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

This paper explores how women think about men’s bodies as objects of desire. It reports on one part of a larger qualitative study on men’s bodywork practices in contemporary Australia. Drawing on material from three focus groups with 24 Australian women of varying ages, sexual orientations and backgrounds, the paper considers how women experience, understand and reflect on their desire for men and men’s bodies. It also explores themes such as the connection women draw between what a man’s body looks like and what it can do, how attraction is experienced, the meaning making women engage in as they think about men and men’s bodies, and the broader politics of sexuality and objectification that inform their perceptions and ideas. These experiences are set against ideas in post-feminist thinking on women’s sexual desire and debates on their sexual empowerment. The paper argues that these women are grappling with tensions between their personal experiences of sexual objectification and a feminist ethics relating to their active and reflexive projects of sexuality.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Waling, A., Duncan, D., Angelides, S., & Dowsett, G. W. (2020). ‘Damn, Channing Tatum can move!’: Women’s accounts of men’s bodies and objectification in post-feminist times. Sexualities. https://doi.org/10.1177/1363460720967657

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free