Nutrition literacy is associated with income and place of residence but not with diet behavior and food security in the Palestinian society

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Abstract

Introduction: Palestinian society is going through health transition that is associated with increase in chronic diseases due to poor dietary habits so adequate integration of nutrition information is important. Aims: The aim of this study is to find the association between nutrition literacy and diet behavior among a group of Palestinian participants. Methods: A sample of 101 Palestinian participants were recruited to participate in the study. An online survey was used to collect study data. Newest Vital Sign quiz was used to collect information on nutrition literacy and Short Format of the Diet Health and Knowledge Survey (SFDHKS) was used to collect information on diet behavior and USDA food security questionnaire was used to collect data on food security. Data was analyzed utilizing SPSS 21. Results: This study included 101 participants, mean age 22.7 y ± 8.7 y, mainly females (females were 83.2% and males were 16.8%). 5.7% of the study participants were obese, 13.8% overweight and 10.3% were underweight. The prevalence of adequate nutrition literacy was 29%. There was minimal association between diet behavior and nutrition literacy, food security and BMI categories, but significant association with income and living in city relative to village (p < 0.05). Only 11 participants had some form of food insecurity. Conclusion: There is low prevalence of adequate nutrition literacy. Nutrition literacy depends on social and economic aspects but further research is need to understand its relationship to diet behavior.

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Natour, N., AL-Tell, M., & Ikhdour, O. (2021). Nutrition literacy is associated with income and place of residence but not with diet behavior and food security in the Palestinian society. BMC Nutrition, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40795-021-00479-3

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