A microplanning model to improve door-to-door health service delivery: the case of Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention in Sub-Saharan African villages

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Abstract

Background: Malaria incidence has plateaued in Sub-Saharan Africa despite Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention’s (SMC) introduction. Community health workers (CHW) use a door-to-door delivery strategy to treat children with SMC drugs, but for SMC to be as effective as in clinical trials, coverage must be high over successive seasons. Methods: We developed and used a microplanning model that utilizes population raster to estimate population size, generates optimal households visit itinerary, and quantifies SMC coverage based on CHWs’ time investment for treatment and walking. CHWs’ performance under current SMC deployment mode was assessed using CHWs’ tracking data and compared to microplanning in villages with varying demographics and geographies. Results: Estimates showed that microplanning significantly reduces CHWs’ walking distance by 25%, increases the number of visited households by 36% (p < 0.001) and increases SMC coverage by 21% from 37.3% under current SMC deployment mode up to 58.3% under microplanning (p < 0.001). Optimal visit itinerary alone increased SMC coverage up to 100% in small villages whereas in larger or hard-to-reach villages, filling the gap additionally needed an optimization of the CHW ratio. Conclusion: We estimate that for a pair of CHWs, the daily optimal number of visited children (assuming 8.5mn spent per child) and walking distance should not exceed 45 (95% CI 27–62) and 5 km (95% CI 3.2–6.2) respectively. Our work contributes to extend SMC coverage by 21–63% and may have broader applicability for other community health programs.

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Ouédraogo, A. L., Zhang, J., Tinto, H., Valéa, I., & Wenger, E. A. (2020). A microplanning model to improve door-to-door health service delivery: the case of Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention in Sub-Saharan African villages. BMC Health Services Research, 20(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-020-05972-2

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