Heterochromatin and microsatellites detection in karyotypes of four sea turtle species: Interspecific chromosomal differences

6Citations
Citations of this article
9Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

The wide variation in size and content of eukaryotic genomes is mainly attributed to the accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences, like microsatellites, which are tandemly repeated DNA sequences. Sea turtles share a diploid number (2n) of 56, however recent molecular cytogenetic data have shown that karyotype conservatism is not a rule in the group. In this study, the heterochromatin distribution and the chromosomal location of microsatellites (CA)n, (GA)n, (CAG)n, (GATA)n, (GAA)n, (CGC)n and (GACA)n in Chelonia mydas, Caretta caretta, Eretmochelys imbricata and Lepidochelys olivacea were comparatively investigated. The obtained data showed that just the (CA)n, (GA)n, (CAG)n and (GATA)n microsatellites were located on sea turtle chromosomes, preferentially in heterochromatic regions of the microchromosomes (mc). Variations in the location of heterochromatin and microsatellites sites, especially in some pericentromeric regions of macrochromosomes, corroborate to proposal of centromere repositioning occurrence in Cheloniidae species. Furthermore, the results obtained with the location of microsatellites corroborate with the temperature sex determination mechanism proposal and the absence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes in sea turtles. The findings are useful for understanding part of the karyotypic diversification observed in sea turtles, especially those that explain the diversification of Carettini from Chelonini species.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Machado, C. R. D., Domit, C., Pucci, M. B., Gazolla, C. B., Glugoski, L., Nogaroto, V., … De Almeida e Val, V. M. F. (2020). Heterochromatin and microsatellites detection in karyotypes of four sea turtle species: Interspecific chromosomal differences. Genetics and Molecular Biology, 43(4), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1590/1678-4685-GMB-2020-0213

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free