Informational demand across the globe: Toward a comparative understanding of information exchange

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Abstract

This study examines the information demands of decision-makers from across the globe in their exchanges with interest organizations. It proposes two explanatory factors that drive these information demands: democracy and development. We argue that decision-makers' information demands vary depending on whether they hail from developed countries or developing countries, as well as the extent to which their political systems are democratically accountable. We test our expectations based on interviews with 297 decision-makers from 107 different countries who were active during transnational trade and climate change negotiations. Our findings demonstrate that decision-makers from less developed countries exhibit a higher preference for interactions with organizations that provide them with technical information. Decision-makers from democratically accountable countries, by contrast, tend to place relatively greater value on political information provided by interest groups.

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Hanegraaff, M., & De Bruycker, I. (2020). Informational demand across the globe: Toward a comparative understanding of information exchange. European Political Science Review, 12(4), 525–543. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1755773920000284

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