Rodent preclinical models for developing novel antiarthritic molecules: Comparative biology and preferred methods for evaluating efficacy

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Abstract

Rodent models of immune-mediated arthritis (RMIA) are the conventional approach to evaluating mechanisms of inflammatory joint disease and the comparative efficacy of antiarthritic agents. Rat adjuvant-induced (AIA), collagen-induced (CIA), and streptococcal cell wall-induced (SCW) arthritides are preferred models of the joint pathology that occurs in human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Lesions of AIA are most severe and consistent; structural and immunological changes of CIA best resemble RA. Lesion extent and severity in RMIA depends on experimental methodology (inciting agent, adjuvant, etc.) and individual physiologic parameters (age, genetics, hormonal status, etc.). The effectiveness of antiarthritic molecules varies with the agent, therapeutic regimen, and choice of RMIA. All RMIA are driven by overactivity of proinflammatory pathways, but the dominant molecules differ among the models. Hence, as with the human clinical experience, the efficacy of various antiarthritic molecules differs among RMIA, especially when the agent is a specific cytokine inhibitor. © 2011 Brad Bolon et al.

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Bolon, B., Stolina, M., King, C., Middleton, S., Gasser, J., Zack, D., & Feige, U. (2011). Rodent preclinical models for developing novel antiarthritic molecules: Comparative biology and preferred methods for evaluating efficacy. Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology. https://doi.org/10.1155/2011/569068

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