Diagnosing social anxiety in Parkinson’s disease: Characteristics and frequencies according to two diagnostic criteria

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Abstract

Background: Studies found inconsistent frequencies of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) (9.7%-50%). Previous reports did not test the impact of applying DSM-IV restrictive criteria that recommends the exclusion of secondary cases when diagnosing SAD in PD. Objective: Our aim is to estimate the frequency of social anxiety according to DSM-IV criteria and according to an inclusive broader approach. Methods: One hundred and ten PD patients were assessed for the presence of SAD using SCID-I, diagnosis of social anxiety were determined according to two different criteria: following and not following DSM-IV recommendation for exclusion of cases though to be secondary to a general medical condition. Results: SAD was present in 34 (31%) of patients, but 17 (15.5%) were secondary to a general medical condition. Patients with SAD were significantly younger, had earlier disease onset, had more severe PD symptoms, and were more frequently depressed. There was no difference in demographic and clinical features between primary and secondary SAD. Discussion: We conclude that the use of different diagnostic criteria may have a massive impact in the estimation of frequency of SAD in PD.

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Moriyama, T. S., Chagas, M. H. N., Silveira-Moriyama, L., Tumas, V., Lees, A. J., Crippa, J. A., & Bressan, R. A. (2016). Diagnosing social anxiety in Parkinson’s disease: Characteristics and frequencies according to two diagnostic criteria. Revista de Psiquiatria Clinica, 43(6), 139–142. https://doi.org/10.1590/0101-60830000000100

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