Patterns of sunscreen use on the face and other exposed skin among US adults

69Citations
Citations of this article
106Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

Background: Sunscreen is a common form of sun protection, but little is known about patterns of use. Objective: We sought to assess patterns of sunscreen use on the face and other exposed skin among US adults. Methods: Using cross-sectional data from the 2013 Summer ConsumerStyles survey (N = 4033), we calculated descriptive statistics and adjusted risk ratios to identify characteristics associated with regular sunscreen use (always/most of the time when outside on a warm sunny day for ≥1 hour). Results: Few adults regularly used sunscreen on the face (men: 18.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 15.8-20.6; women: 42.6%, 95% CI 39.5-46.7), other exposed skin (men: 19.9%, 95% CI 17.5-22.6; women: 34.4%, 95% CI 31.5-37.5), or both the face and other exposed skin (men: 14.3%, 95% CI 12.3-16.6; women: 29.9%, 95% CI 27.2-32.8). Regular use was associated with sun-sensitive skin, an annual household income ≥$60,000, and meeting aerobic activity guidelines (Ps < .05). Nearly 40% of users were unsure if their sunscreen provided broad-spectrum protection. Limitations: Reliance on self-report and lack of information on sunscreen reapplication or other sun-safety practices are limitations. Conclusion: Sunscreen use is low, especially among certain demographic groups. These findings can inform sun-safety interventions and the interpretation of surveillance data on sunscreen use.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Holman, D. M., Berkowitz, Z., Guy, G. P., Hawkins, N. A., Saraiya, M., & Watson, M. (2015). Patterns of sunscreen use on the face and other exposed skin among US adults. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 73(1), 83-92.e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2015.02.1112

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free