Experimental myocardial infarction induces altered regulatory T cell hemostasis, and adoptive transfer attenuates subsequent remodeling

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Abstract

Background: Ischemic cardiac damage is associated with upregulation of cardiac pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as invasion of lymphocytes into the heart. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are known to exert a suppressive effect on several immune cell types. We sought to determine whether the Treg pool is influenced by myocardial damage and whether Tregs transfer and deletion affect cardiac remodeling. Methods and Results: The number and functional suppressive activity of Tregs were assayed in mice subjected to experimental myocardial infarction. The numbers of splenocyte-derived Tregs in the ischemic mice were significantly higher after the injury than in the controls, and their suppressive properties were significantly compromised. Compared with PBS, adoptive Treg transfer to mice with experimental infarction reduced infarct size and improved LV remodeling and functional performance by echocardiography. Treg deletion with blocking anti-CD25 antibodies did not influence infarct size or echocardiographic features of cardiac remodeling. Conclusion: Treg numbers are increased whereas their function is compromised in mice with that underwent experimental infarction. Transfer of exogeneous Tregs results in attenuation of myocardial remodeling whereas their ablation has no effect. Thus, Tregs may serve as interesting potential interventional targets for attenuating left ventricular remodeling.

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APA

Sharir, R., Semo, J., Shimoni, S., Ben-Mordechai, T., Landa-Rouben, N., Maysel-Auslender, S., … George, J. (2014). Experimental myocardial infarction induces altered regulatory T cell hemostasis, and adoptive transfer attenuates subsequent remodeling. PLoS ONE, 9(12). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0113653

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