Household Factors Associated with Self-Harm in Johannesburg, South African Urban-Poor Households

1Citations
Citations of this article
39Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Introduction Low and middle income countries bear the majority burden of self-harm, yet there is a paucity of evidence detailing risk-factors for self-harm in these populations. This study aims to identify environmental, socio-economic and demographic household-level risk factors for self-harm in five impoverished urban communities in Johannesburg, South Africa. Methods Annual serial cross-sectional surveys were undertaken in five impoverished urban communities in Johannesburg for the Health, Environment and Development (HEAD) study. Logistic regression analysis using the HEAD study data (2006-2011) was conducted to identify household-level risk factors associated with self-harm (defined as a self-reported case of a fatal or non-fatal suicide attempt) within the household during the preceding year. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was employed to identify factors associated with self-harm. Results A total of 2 795 household interviews were conducted from 2006 to 2011. There was no significant trend in self-harm over time. Results from the final model showed that self-harm was significantly associated with households exposed to a violent crime during the past year (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 5.72; 95% CI 1.64-19.97); that have a member suffering from a chronic medical condition (AOR 8.95; 95% 2.39-33.56) and households exposed to indoor smoking (AOR 4.39; CI 95% 1.14-16.47). Conclusion This study provides evidence on household risk factors of self-harm in settings of urban poverty and has highlighted the potential for a more cost-effective approach to identifying those at risk of self-harm based on household level factors.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Naicker, N., De Jager, P., Naidoo, S., & Mathee, A. (2016). Household Factors Associated with Self-Harm in Johannesburg, South African Urban-Poor Households. PLoS ONE, 11(1). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0146239

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free