Evaluation of methionine content in a high-fat and choline-deficient diet on body weight gain and the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice

10Citations
Citations of this article
35Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Aim: Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a globally recognized liver disease. A methionineand choline-deficient diet is used to induce NASH in mice; however, this diet also causes severe body weight loss. To resolve this issue, we examined the effects of methionine content in a high-fat and choline-deficient (HFCD) diet on body weight and the development of NASH in mice. Methods: C57BL/6J mice (male, 10 weeks of age) were fed an L-amino acid rodent (control) diet, high-fat (HF) diet, or HFCD diet containing various amounts of methionine (0.1-0.6% (w/w)) for 12 weeks. Plasma lipid levels, hepatic lipid content and inflammatory marker gene expression were measured, and a pathological analysis was conducted to evaluate NASH. Results: The 0.1% methionine in HFCD diet suppressed body weight gain, which was lower than that with control diet. On the other hand, the 0.2% methionine in HFCD diet yielded similar body weight gains as the control diet, while more than 0.4% methionine showed the same body weight gains as the HF diet. Liver weights and hepatic lipid contents were the greatest with 0.1% methionine and decreased in a methionine dose-dependent manner. Pathological analysis, NAFLD activity scores and gene expression levels in the liver revealed that 0.1% and 0.2% methionine for 12 weeks induced NASH, whereas 0.4% and 0.6% methionine attenuated the induction of NASH by HFCD diet. However, the 0.2% methionine in HFCD diet did not induce insulin resistance, despite the body weight gain. Conclusions: The 0.2% methionine in HFCD diet for 12 weeks was able to induce NASH without weight loss.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Chiba, T., Suzuki, S., Sato, Y., Itoh, T., & Umegaki, K. (2016). Evaluation of methionine content in a high-fat and choline-deficient diet on body weight gain and the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice. PLoS ONE, 11(10). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0164191

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free