Epidemiological and clinical profiles of respiratory syncytial virus infection in hospitalized neonates in Suzhou, China

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Abstract

Background: This study was designed to explore the epidemiological and clinical profiles of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in neonates from the Suzhou area of China, taking into consideration how climate factors influence disease. Methods: From 2010 to 2014, nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) collected from hospitalized neonates with lower respiratory tract infections (LRIs) were screened for seven common respiratory viruses including RSV by direct immunofluorescence assay. Human bocavirus, human metapneumovirus, and mycoplasma pneumoniae were detected by polymerase chain reaction. Results: Of the 1803 hospitalized neonates analyzed, 20.74 % were found to be infected with RSV. Interestingly, 30 subjects were identified as being coinfected with other viruses. The rate of RSV infection was highestduring thewinter and early spring seasons; however, infection was negatively associated with monthly mean temperature (rs = -0.821, P < 0.0001), total rainfall (rs = -0.406, P = 0.002), and sum of sunshine (rs = -0.386, P = 0.001). Monthly mean temperature was the only independent factor associated with RSV activity, as determined using multivariate regression analysis. Compared with non-RSV neonates, neonates with RSV infection presented more frequently with tachypnea,moist rales, and abnormal chest X-rays requiring supplemental oxygen and extended hospitalization postpartum. Neonatal admittance into the NICU was determined based on prematurity and coinfection with other viruses; two independent risk factors for RSV disease, as determined by multivariate logistic analysis. Conclusions: Important as a major cause of LRIs in hospitalized neonate, we found that the subtropical climate of the Suzhou area was associated with RSV activity. The identified risk factors ofsevere disease in neonates with RSV infection should be taken into consideration when implementing disease health interventions.

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Lu, L., Yan, Y., Yang, B., Xiao, Z., Feng, X., Wang, Y., … Chen, Z. (2015). Epidemiological and clinical profiles of respiratory syncytial virus infection in hospitalized neonates in Suzhou, China. BMC Infectious Diseases, 15(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-015-1155-x

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