Match-fixing in sport: Comparative studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and beyond

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Abstract

Match-fixing represents a greater potential threat to the integrity of sport than doping. It has been linked to organised crime, illegal drugs and money-laundering. Law enforcement and sporting authorities are struggling to establish legal and regulatory responses to this emerging threat, particularly in light of cross-border internet gambling. This book examines match-fixing and the legal responses to it in three key Asian sporting nations: Australia, Japan and Korea. It explores the significance of legal, regulatory and cultural differences, and draws lessons in terms of best practice and enforcement for legal and sporting authorities around the world. Including key insights from players, the betting industry, law enforcement and prosecution authorities, it discusses the strengths and weakness of current anti-corruption strategies in the three jurisdictions. Match-Fixing in Sport: Comparative Studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and Beyond offers important insights for all students and scholars with an interest in sport studies, law, criminology and Asian studies.

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APA

Steele, S., & Opie, H. (2017). Match-fixing in sport: Comparative studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and beyond. Match-Fixing in Sport: Comparative Studies from Australia, Japan, Korea and Beyond (pp. 1–254). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315228280

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