The association of hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype with chronic kidney disease and its sex difference: A cross-sectional study in an urban chinese elderly population

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Abstract

Background: The primary objective of this study was to explore the association of hypertriglyceridemic waist (HTGW) phenotype with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its sex difference in an urban Chinese elderly population. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 2102 participants aged 60–95 years were recruited and classified into four phenotypes: normal waist-normal triglyceride (NWNT), normal waist-elevated triglycerides (NWET), elevated waist-normal triglycerides (EWNT), and HTGW. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the associations of interest. Results: Total prevalence of CKD was 12.6%, and the CKD prevalence in participants with EWNT and HTGW was higher than with NWNT and NWET without regard to sex. Compared to NWNT phenotype, the adjusted OR for CKD was 1.95 (95% CI: 1.32–2.88) in HTGW groups. In contrast with the null findings (OR: 1.66; 95% CI: 0.94–2.94) in women after additional adjustment for diabetes and hypertension, the OR with HTGW remained strong (OR: 1.88; 95% CI: 1.04–3.39) in men. Similar findings appeared with the EWNT phenotype. Conclusions: The HTGW phenotype is positively associated with CKD among Chinese community elderly and may have a greater impact on men. More attention should be paid to the association between triglycerides and waist circumference in clinical practice and to the further identification this uncertain sex-related association.

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Zeng, J., Liu, M., Wu, L., Wang, J., Yang, S., Wang, Y., … He, Y. (2016). The association of hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype with chronic kidney disease and its sex difference: A cross-sectional study in an urban chinese elderly population. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 13(12). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13121233

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