Anthropogenic factors are the major cause of hospital admission of a threatened species, the grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus), in Victoria, Australia

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Abstract

To determine the reasons for presentation and outcomes of hospitalised grey-headed flying foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) in Victoria, Australia, a retrospective analysis was performed on 532 records from two wildlife hospitals. Cases were categorised based on presenting signs and outcomes determined. Anthropogenic factors (63.7%) were a major cause of flying fox admissions with entanglement in fruit netting the most significant risk for bats (36.8%). Overall the mortality rate for flying fox admissions was 59.3%. This study highlights the effects of urbanisation on wild animal populations and a need for continued public education in order to reduce morbidity and mortality of wildlife, especially threatened species.

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Scheelings, T. F., & Frith, S. E. (2015). Anthropogenic factors are the major cause of hospital admission of a threatened species, the grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus), in Victoria, Australia. PLoS ONE, 10(7). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0133638

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