Alzheimer's Disease as the Product of a Progressive Energy Deficiency Syndrome in the Central Nervous System: The Neuroenergetic Hypothesis

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Abstract

The decreased availability of metabolizable energy resources in the central nervous system is hypothesized to be a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. More specifically, the age-related decline in the ability of glucose to cross the blood-brain barrier creates a metabolic stress that shifts the normal, benign processing of amyloid-β protein precursor toward pathways associated with the production of amyloid-β plaques and tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles that are characteristic of the disease. The neuroenergetic hypothesis provides insight into the etiology of Alzheimer's disease and illuminates new approaches for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment.

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Blonz, E. R. (2017). Alzheimer’s Disease as the Product of a Progressive Energy Deficiency Syndrome in the Central Nervous System: The Neuroenergetic Hypothesis. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 60(4), 1223–1229. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-170549

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