Rupture of the thoracic aorta associated with experimental Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in a dog

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Abstract

This note describes the sudden death of a dog by the rupture of the thoracic aorta caused by the presence of Angiostrongylus vasorum. A female mongrel canine with a history of weight loss and exhaustion died two hours after clinical examination. At necropsy, performed one hour after death, showed the presence of clotted blood in the thoracic cavity. Haemothorax was diagnosed. The thoracic aorta wall was thin, congested and an abnormal hole in the wall was detected approximately 0.5 cm from the entrance to the diaphragm. From clotted blood collected from the thoracic cavity, 224 first stage larvae (L1) and 15 adults of Angiostrongylus vasorum were recovered alive. Also, from a blood clot found in the aorta, four adult females and 47 L1 larvae were recovered alive. Possibly, this parasite was responsible for the aortic rupture and death of the animal. 1.

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Mozzer, L. R., & Lima, W. S. (2012). Rupture of the thoracic aorta associated with experimental Angiostrongylus vasorum infection in a dog. Parasite. EDP Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1051/parasite/2012192189

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