Megacities as sources for pathogenic bacteria in rivers and their fate downstream

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Abstract

Poor sanitation, poor treatments of waste water, as well as catastrophic floods introduce pathogenic bacteria into rivers, infecting and killing many people. The goal of clean water for everyone has to be achieved with a still growing human population and their rapid concentration in large cities, often megacities. How long introduced pathogens survive in rivers and what their niches are remain poorly known but essential to control water-borne diseases in megacities. Biofilms are often niches for various pathogens because they possess high resistances against environmental stress. They also facilitate gene transfers of antibiotic resistance genes which become an increasing health problem. Beside biofilms, amoebae are carriers of pathogenic bacteria and niches for their survival. An overview about our current understanding of the fate and niches of pathogens in rivers, the multitude of microbial community interactions, and the impact of severe flooding, a prerequisite to control pathogens in polluted rivers, is given. Copyright © 2011 Wolf-Rainer Abraham.

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APA

Abraham, W. R. (2011). Megacities as sources for pathogenic bacteria in rivers and their fate downstream. International Journal of Microbiology. https://doi.org/10.1155/2011/798292

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