Decision-making deficits are associated with learning impairments in female college students at high risk for anorexia nervosa: Iowa gambling task and prospect valence learning model

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Abstract

This study investigated deficits in decision-making ability in female college students at high risk for anorexia nervosa (AN) using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the prospect valence learning (PVL) model. Based on scores on the Korean version of the Eating Attitude Test-26 (KEAT-26), participants were assigned to either the high risk for AN group (n = 42) or the control group (n = 43). The high risk for AN group exhibited significantly lower total net scores and block net scores on the third, fourth, and fifth blocks of the IGT than the control group did. The high risk for AN group selected cards significantly more often from the disadvantageous A and B decks and less often from the advantageous D deck than the control group did. In addition, the block net scores of the high risk for AN group did not differ across the five blocks, whereas those of the control group increased as the trials progressed. There was a significant negative correlation between IGT total net score and total score on the KEAT−26. The high risk for AN group had significantly lower values than the control group on the learning and response consistency parameters of the PVL model. These results indicate that female college students at high risk for AN have deficits in decision-making ability, and that these deficits are related to difficulties in remembering experience obtained from earlier trials and applying it to later trials. These difficulties further lead them to make decisions randomly.

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Na, E., Kang, B., & Kim, M. S. (2019). Decision-making deficits are associated with learning impairments in female college students at high risk for anorexia nervosa: Iowa gambling task and prospect valence learning model. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 10(JAN). https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00759

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