Analysis of the relationship between the referral and evolution of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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Abstract

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic disease that has risen in prominence in recent years and can cause serious complications. Several studies show that the level of adherence to different types of treatment has a direct correlation with the positive evolution of chronic diseases. While such studies relate to patient adherence to medication, those that concern adherence to medical appointments do not distinguish between the different disciplines that attend to or refer patients. This study analyses the relationship between adherence to referrals made by three distinct disciplines (doctors, nurses, and nutritionists) and the results of HbA1c tests from a sample of 2290 patients with T2DM. The aim is to determine whether a relationship exists between patient improvement and the frequency with which they attend scheduled appointments in a timely manner, having been previously referred from or to a particular discipline. Results showed that patients tended to be more adherent when their next appointment is with a doctor, and less adherent when it is with a nurse or nutritionist. Furthermore, patients that remained stable had higher rates of adherence, whereas those with lower adherence tended to be more decompensated. The results can enable healthcare professionals to monitor patients and place particular emphasis on those who do not attend their scheduled appointments in a timely manner.

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APA

Alvarez, C., Saint-Pierre, C., Herskovic, V., & Sepúlveda, M. (2018). Analysis of the relationship between the referral and evolution of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(7). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071534

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