Baseline obesity status modifies effectiveness of adapted diabetes prevention program lifestyle interventions for weight management in primary care

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Abstract

Objective. To examine whether baseline obesity severity modifies the effects of two different, primary care-based, technology-enhanced lifestyle interventions among overweight or obese adults with prediabetes and/or metabolic syndrome. Patients and Methods. We compared mean differences in changes from baseline to 15 months in clinical measures of general and central obesity among participants randomized to usual care alone (n = 81) or usual care plus a coach-led group (n = 79) or self-directed individual (n = 81) intervention, stratified by baseline body mass index (BMI) category. Results. Participants with baseline BMI 35 + had greater reductions in mean BMI, body weight (as percentage change), and waist circumference in the coach-led group intervention, compared to usual care and the self-directed individual intervention (P < 0. 05 for all). In contrast, the self-directed intervention was more effective than usual care only among participants with baseline BMIs between 25 ≤ 35. Mean weight loss exceeded 5% in the coach-led intervention regardless of baseline BMI category, but this was achieved only among self-directed intervention participants with baseline BMIs < 35. Conclusions. Baseline BMI may influence behavioral weight-loss treatment effectiveness. Researchers and clinicians should take an individual's baseline BMI into account when developing or recommending lifestyle focused treatment strategy. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00842426. © 2013 Kristen M. J. Azar et al.

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Azar, K. M. J., Xiao, L., & Ma, J. (2013). Baseline obesity status modifies effectiveness of adapted diabetes prevention program lifestyle interventions for weight management in primary care. BioMed Research International, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/191209

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